Counter Wildlife Trafficking

Illegal wildlife trade is one of the largest forms of transnational organized crime today. In India, trade in over 1,800 species of wild animals, plants and their derivatives, is prohibited under the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. 


As one of the 17 megadiverse countries of the world, India acts as a source as well as a transit country to meet the growing appetite for illegal wildlife products. While crimes such as narcotic trade, arms trafficking, and human trafficking have received dedicated attention of enforcement agencies and lawmakers, wildlife crimes continue to be treated with exclusivity and as one-off incidents. However, as reports have time and again pointed out the organized nature of wildlife trafficking, dismantling it requires a collaborative action by several stakeholders at both the center and state level within the country.


WCS-India’s Counter Wildlife Trafficking program works to enable mandated agencies to effectively detect, identify, investigate, arrest, prosecute, and convict criminal organizations that perpetrate wildlife trafficking. Our goal is to work closely with the government to improve conviction rates of wildlife traffickers, and ultimately dismantle organized wildlife trafficking networks. 


The Counter Wildlife Trafficking program plays the role of a facilitator, enabling government officials to gain access to information, skills, technology, and expert support required to tackle wildlife related crime in India. 


Our work consists of conducting training and sensitization workshops for state Forest Departments, Police, Customs officials, security forces such as the Border Security Force and Sashastra Seema Bal, and the judiciary. These trainings focus primarily on conducting professional wildlife crime investigations and promoting inter-agency collaboration through the involvement of multiple allied agencies in training. Beyond trainings conducted in collaboration with the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau, India’s premier federal agency dedicated to wildlife trafficking, we have also worked to establish strong formal partnerships through MoUs with the state Forest Departments of Telangana, Nagaland, West Bengal, and the Border Security Force. 


Our close partnership with the Directorate of Enforcement has enabled officers from various Forest Departments to be introduced to crucial aspects of financial investigation under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act, 2002 by anti-money laundering experts.  

 

We have also developed technical assistance to aid government officers in tackling wildlife crime. This includes a dedicated helpline to address questions related to wildlife crime, a network of lawyers who provide pro bono legal support to draft and file court documents, a smartphone application that will enable authorized government officers to accurately draft the preliminary offence report, and establishment of a wildlife crime database and use of the investigative analysis software i2 to provide strategic intelligence reports to agencies on critical wildlife trafficking cases. In addition to this, we are currently conducting a gap analysis based on district court judgements to identify common errors in prosecution that lead to failure of cases in court.  


 

Resource Manuals

Wildlife Trade - Investigation Guide (English)

Wildlife Trade - Investigation Guide (Bengali)

Wildlife Trade - Species Identification Guide (English)

Wildlife Trade - Species Identification Guide (Bengali)

Report on poaching & trade of Golden Jackals

 


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Trade in wildlife has existed for decades. However, trafficking is no longer synonymous only with illegal trade in big charismatic fauna or their parts, such as the pelts of big cats, rhino horns, elephant ivory and so on.

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Poaching and Illegal Trafficking have Almost Decimated Pangolins

Dedicatedly, with powerful strokes, a man tries to hack a tree trunk for inside it hides a scaly treasure, a pangolin. Traumatized and scared, the pangolin refuses to come out of its safe abode.

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Have queries on Illegal Wildlife Trafficking?

Contact cwt@wcsindia.org

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Contact Information
Address: 551, 7th Main Road Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, 2nd Phase Bengaluru - 560097 Karnataka, India https://g.page/WCS-India?share | 080-2973-7455